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monologues with multivariate analysis

I wanted to re-re-refresh my understanding of multivariate analysis in ecology. So, here is my monologue of my googleventures.

First stop: I accidentally landed into this paper:

TEACHING MULTIVARIATE STATISTICS TO ECOLOGISTS AND THE DESIGN OF ECOLOGICAL EXPERIMENTS TO STATISTICIANS: LESSONS FROM BOTH SIDES

Snippets from: Link

“Ecologists generally become interested in multivariate analysis because they already have multivariate data”

“Incorrect inferences and conclusions can be drawn from ecological experiments that fail to take into account natural temporal and spatial variability. “

Which species are responsible for group differences?

This last line lead me to another paper by the author. At this time, I was generally interested to find out ways to identify species that are causing the difference between two communities: link

CANONICAL ANALYSIS OF PRINCIPAL COORDINATES: A USEFUL METHOD OF CONSTRAINED ORDINATION FOR ECOLOGY

An unconstrained ordination may be useful to visualize overall patterns of dispersion, but this simple example also demonstrates how real differences in location, which were masked in the PCA, were uncovered by the canonical approach.

In either case, correlations of species with canonical axes will provide a good indication of which species should be investigated in more detail with univariate analysis.

Clearly, this use of correlations with canonical axes is an indirect ‘‘post hoc’’ way of identifying possible contributions of individual species to differences among groups.

I failed to identify the right procedure, however it is unclear if it should be trusted anyways based on the last snippet that i posted here.

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Categories: Ecology
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